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The current programme is available below

Please note this may still be subject to change


 

Tuesday 7th July, 2015

14:00

Check in at the college

16:00-19:00

Registration

Session Chairs: Jerry Brown, Angela Brueggemann and Tim Mitchell

16:45-17:00

Welcome and Introduction

17:00-18:00

PL.01 Penicillin resistance in Streptococcus pneumoniae - evolution by genetic communication

Regine Hakenbeck, Department of Microbiology, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany

18:00-19:00

Welcome Reception

19:00-20:00

Dinner in the college

 

 

 

Wednesday 8th July, 2015

09:00–09:30

 

PL.02 Structure and assembly of the cell wall in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Waldemar Vollmer, Newcastle University Medical School, United Kingdom

Genomics

Session Chairs: Angela Brueggemann and Mario Ramirez

09:30-09:45

 

O1.1 Identification of Pneumococcal Colonization Determinants in the Stringent Response Pathway, Facilitated by Genomic Diversity

Marc Lipsitch, Harvard TH Chan School of Public Health, USA

09:45-10:00

O1.2 Genomics reveals the worldwide distribution of multidrug-resistant serotype 6E pneumococci

Andries van Tonder, University of Oxford, UK

10:00-10:15

O1.3 The post-vaccine microevolution of invasive pneumococcal disease

Fredrick Mobegi, Radboud University Medical Centre, The Netherlands

10:15-10:30

O1.4 Mechanisms of pneumococcal evolution over short and long timescales

Nicholas Croucher, Imperial College, UK

10:30-10:45

O1.5 Genetic stabilization of the pandemic and drug resistant PMEN1 pneumococcus lineage by its distinctive DpnIII restriction-modification system

Luisa Hiller, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

10:45-11:15

Coffee break

Molecular Microbiology and Genetics 1

Session Chair: Donald Morrison Adele de la Campa

11:15-11:30

O2.1 MapZ beacons the division sites and positions FtsZ−rings in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Christophe Grangeasse, CNRS - University of Lyon, France

11:30-11:45

O2.2 Competence for genetic transformation in Streptococcus pneumoniae: Primary sigma factor mutations enhance transcription of late genes in comW mutants  

Donald Morrison, University of Illinois at Chicago, USA

11:45-12:00

O2.3 A new role for Autoinducer-2 in Streptococcus pneumoniae

James Paton, University of Adelaide, Australia

12:00-12:15

O2.4 Spatial and dynamic organization of the chromosome and DNA replication machinery in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Morten Kjos, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

12:15-12:30

O2.5 Repressor of Iron Transport Regulator (RitR) is a novel cysteine-activated redox sensor in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Andrew Ulijasz, Imperial College London, UK

12:30-12:45

O2.6 A Tale of Two Regulators: Characterization of two peptide-regulated transcription factors in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Anagha Kadam, Carnegie Mellon University, USA

13:00-14:00

Lunch

Antibiotics and Immunotherapy

Session Chairs: Jeffrey Weiser and Raquel Sá-Leão

14:00-14:15

 

O3.1 Cpl-711, a powerful enzyme against pneumococci

Roberto Díez-Martínez, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas-CSIC, Spain

14:15-14:30

 

O3.2 Esters of bicyclic amines: a new generation of antimicrobials against pneumococcus

Jesus Sanz, University Miguel Hernandez, Spain

14:30-14:45

O3.3 Identification of new cell wall biogenesis factors in Streptococcus pneumoniae using Tn-Seq.

Andrew Fenton, Harvard Medical School, USA

14:45-15:00

O3.4 Engineered liposomes sequester pneumolysin and protect from severe invasive pneumococcal disease in mice.

Laura Bricio Moreno, University of Liverpool, UK

15:00-16:30

Poster Session I

16:00-16:30

Tea and Coffee

Immunology

Session Chairs: Carlos Orihuela and Tim Mitchell

16:30-16:45

 

O4.1 DNA-release by Streptococcus pneumoniae autolysin LytA induced Krueppel-like factor 4 expression controlling pneumococci-related innate immune response in macrophages

Janine Zahlten, Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany

16:45-17:00

 

O4.2 The pneumococcal whole cell vaccine reduces influenza-induced pneumococcal disease in the ears and lungs of co-infected infant mice.

Jayne Manning, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Australia

17:00-17:15

O4.3 Within-host selection increases macrophage survival of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Giuseppe Ercoli, University of Leicester, UK

17:15-17:30

O4.4 The effect of macrophage polarisation and delayed apoptosis in the innate immune response to Streptococcus pneumoniae infection

Lucy Morris, University of Sheffield, UK

17:30-17:45

 O4.5 Murine respiratory tract microbiome: important interactions with IL-17 and pneumococcal colonisation.

Neil Ritchie, University of Glasgow, UK

17:45

Group Photo

19:30-20:00

Banquet Drinks Reception

20:00

Banquet

 

 

 

Thursday 9th July, 2015

09:00–09:30

 

PL.03 Immuno-regulatory control of host susceptibility to pneumococcal carriage and invasive disease 

Aras Kadioglu, University of Liverpool, United Kingdom

Molecular Microbiology and Genetics 2

Session Chairs: Marco Oggioni and Angela Brueggemann

09:30-09:45

 

O5.1 Zinc homeostasis in  Streptococcus pneumoniae during disease

Bart Eijkelkamp, University of Adelaide, Australia

09:45-10:00

O5.2 The pneumococcal Mga Spn virulence transcriptional regulator

Alicia Bravo, Centro de Investigaciones Biológicas, CSIC, Spain

10:00-10:15

O5.3 Genomic analyses of pneumococci reveal a wide diversity of bacteriocins - including pneumocyclicin, a novel circular bacteriocin

Angela Brueggemann, Univerisity of Oxford, UK

10:15-10:30

O5.4 Antibiotic-induced bacteriocin expression; regulatory interplay between the blp and com systems in Streptococcus pneumonia

Morten Kjos, University of Groningen, The Netherlands

10:30-10:45

O5.5 Conserved Streptococcus pneumoniae spirosomes point toward a single type of transformation pilus in competence

Petya Krasteva, Pasteur Institute, France

10:45-11:15

Coffee break

Pathogenesis 1

Session Chair: James Paton and Jerry Brown

11:15-11:30

O6.1 Pathogenesis of Nonencapsulated Streptococcus pneumonia in Experimental Otitis Media

Larry McDaniel, University of Mississippi Medical Center, USA

11:30-11:45

O6.2 Modulation of nasopharyngeal innate defences by viral co-infection predisposes individuals to experimental pneumococcal carriage

Daniela Ferreira, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK

11:45-12:00

O6.3 Circulating pneumolysin is a potent inducer of cardiac injury during pneumococcal infection

Yasir Alhamdi, University of Liverpool, UK

12:00-12:15

O6.4 Streptococcus pneumoniae invades the heart during severe pneumonia in a non-human primate model

Carlos Orihuela, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, USA

12:15-12:30

O6.5 Inflammation dampening effects of pneumolysin

Jimstan Periselneris, UCL, UK

12:30-12:45

O6.6 A phase variable genetic switch regulates pneumococcal virulence via epigenetic changes.

Marco Oggioni, University of Leicester, UK

13:00-14:00

Lunch

Vaccinology

Session Chairs: Tim Mitchell and Eliane Miyaji

14:15-14:30

 

O7.1 Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Reduces the Rate, Density and Duration of Experimental Human Pneumococcal Colonisation:  First Human Challenge Testing of a Pneumococcal Vaccine - A double blind randomised controlled trial

Jenna Gritzfeld, Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, UK

14:30-14:45

 

O7.2 Heterologous protection against S. pneumonia colonization by the mucosal adjuvant Cholera toxin subunit B

Kirsten Kuipers, Radboud UMC Nijmegen, The Netherlands

14:45-15:00

O7.3 In vivo efficacy of recombinant protein polysaccharide conjugate pneumococcal vaccines.

Jenny Herbert, University of Birmingham, UK

15:00-15:15

O7.4 Immune Responses to Pneumococcal Vaccination in HIV-infected Adults in the UK

Sian Faustini, University of Birmingham, UK

15:15-15:30

O7.5 The agglutinating effects of anti-capsular antibody contribute to pneumococcal clearance

Aoife Roche, University of Pennsylvania, USA

15:30-16:00

Tea and Coffee

Bacterial Metabolism

Session Chairs:  Lucy Hathaway and Waldemar Vollmer

16:00-16:15

 

O8.1 PBP2b, MreD and DivIVA constitute a functional unit in the peripheral peptidoglycan synthesis machinery of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Leiv Sigve Håvarstein, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, Norway

16:15-16:30

 

O8.2 Conformational plasticity of choline-binding modules: β-hairpin to α-helix transition of choline-binding repeats triggered by detergent micelles and membrane vesicles

Jesus Sanz, University Miguel Hernandez, Spain

16:30-16:45

O8.3 On the interaction between the pneumococcal cell wall and the choline-binding modules (CBMs): evaluation of binding affinities and effect of externally added CBMs to bacterial cultures.

Manuel Sanchez, University Miguel Hernandez, Spain

16:45-17:00

O0.4 Conditional lethal mutants reveal that FtsA is needed at early and late stages of cell division in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Orietta Massidda, University of Cagliari, Italy

17:00-18:30

Poster Session II with drinks reception

19:00-20:00

Dinner in the college for residential delegates

 

 

 

Friday 10th July, 2015

09:15–09:45

 

PL.04 An ecological perspective on symbiosis between Streptococcus pneumoniae and the host

Debby Bogaert, Wilhelmina Children’s Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, The Netherlands

Bacterial Surface/Structural Biology

Session Chairs: Juan Hermoso and Sven Hammerschmidt

09:45-10:00

 

O9.1 Structural basis of PcsB-mediated cell separation in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Juan Hermoso, Institute Physical-Chemistry Rocasolano. CSIC, Spain

10:00-10:15

O9.2 Single molecule force spectroscopy reveals interaction strength between Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4 pilus-1 tip protein RrgA and human fibronectin

Tanja Becke, University of Applied Sciences Munich, Germany

10:15-10:30

O9.3 Structural basis for selective recognition of microbial and endogeneus polysaccharides by SIGN-R1 receptor

Iván Acebrón, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas, Spain

10:30-10:45

O9.4 New insights into structure, biosynthesis and pro-inflammatory potential of pneumococcal teichoic acids

Nicolas Gisch, Research Center Borstel, Germany

10:45-11:00

O9.5 LocZ is a new cell division protein that directs septum placement in Streptococcus pneumoniae

Nela Holecková, Academy of Science, Czech Republic

11:00-11:30

Coffee break

Pathogenesis/Cell Biology

Session Chairs: Jerry Brown snd David Dockrell

11:30-11:45

O10.1 Streptococcus pneumoniae Interaction with Brain Derived Neural Cells and Alterations in Functional State of The Cells

Yaffa Mizrachi Nebenzahl, Ben Gurion University of the Negev, Israel

11:45-12:00

O10.2 PSGL-1 receptor on leukocytes is a critical component of the host immune response against invasive pneumococcal disease

Elisa Ramos-Sevillano, Instituto de Salud Carlos III., Spain

12:00-12:15

O10.3 Pneumococcal adhesins PavB and PspC are important for the interplay with human thrombospondin-1

Ulrike Binsker, University of Greifswald, Germany

12:15-12:30

O10.4 The sialic acid N-acetyl neuraminic acid acts as a human-specific signal to enhance virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4

Karina Hentrich, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden

12:30-12:45

O10.5 Mcl-1 regulates mitochondrial ROS-mediated bacterial killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae in macrophages and defines susceptibility to pulmonary infection in COPD

Martin Bewley, University of Sheffield, UK

12:45-13:00

Closing Remarks

13:00-14:00

Lunch

Afternoon

Social Programme

Punting and Guided Tour of Oxford